Reality Check India

On Jallikattu

Posted in Uncategorized by realitycheck on January 15, 2008

This unique Tamil tradition and above all the legend of the “murattu kaalai” (rough bull) must live on.

Happy Pongal Everyone.

I was much distressed over the ban on Jallikattu imposed by the Supreme Court. Now, there is some relief – the honble court has allowed it on a review petition. So, the good times continue to roll.

Reality Check’s view on this is that not only must the sport not be banned, it must be encouraged actively. There are several misconceptions in the media about the sport. NDTV calls is a Tamil bloodsport.

First, a quick intro about the sport.

(From my knowledge , others can tweak it in the comments section)
Jallikattu is a bull control sport, not a bull taming sport. The spanish bullfights seem like an bollywood romantic dance in comparison. The bulls are larger, more powerful, the horns are sharpened, they are also worked up. The fighters are completely unarmed. Unlike the spanish bullfights, the bulls are not softened by damaging their bodies before the fight. It is more like a freestyle rodeo event than a bull-vs-man death match. Best of all, unlike the spanish bullfights – the bull is the hero here. He lives to see another day.

Imagine this scene

It is pongal time in a south Tamilnadu small town. Some colourful but restless bulls are held down by their owners in a holding area. They are all decked up after a special bath and prayers at the temple. This is the day these bulls have been waiting for all year. Most are naturally aggressive bulls that require just a few drum beats to get worked up. There is a dias where some gifts are kept for the winners (cookers, cycles, buckets, cash, watches). A few VIPs are on the dias watching the proceedings. Crowds mill around the opening of the bull pen (or a large hole in the temple wall). They leave some room for the bulls to run towards the open field on the other side. One by one, the owners let go of the bulls – these bulls then go on a wild rampage in the general direction of the open field. The youth then hold on to the bulls shoulder muscle or horns. If you hold on long enough, you are a winner.  The rules are really not very clear about the amount of time or the distance you must hold on to win. The bulls run into the field and eventually calm down. The next bull makes its way from the pen… and so on.

Top four reasons why Jallikattu must be encouraged.


1. Jallikattu is not only an ancient Tamil sport, it also has hindu religious significance.

There is strong sentiment amoung the people that a year without Jallikattu will bring famine, cholera, and other disease to that area. Now, this might get the super-scientific atheist types worked up, still this religious folk sentiment has to be respected. This is similar to the Ram Sethu issue, where you balance economic benefits against religious sentiment. In this case, you balance animal rights concerns against religious sentiment. In both cases the secular state must tread carefully. I am disappointed the BJP has not taken a strong stand on this issue, could be presumably due to their lack of familiarity.

2. It is cruelty to .. humans.

The bull is almost never hurt, leave alone killed. The issues raised by the Blue Cross can be addressed by regulation. The cruelty to humans part is moot, because it is a voluntary sport like boxing and car racing. Can facing Shaun Tait at Perth be construed to be cruelty to humans ?

3. The murattu kaalai (angry bull) is important for livestock.

If cattle could talk, almost all of them would say, “I want to be a jallikattu bull instead of hauling load all over town as a bullock”. The amount of care the owners give to these bulls need to be seen. These bulls do almost no work, they get fed the best food and typically loiter all over the village. Almost everyone leaves them alone, because they know this is a bad un with a foul temper. As they acquire reputation every Pongal, they become highly sought after for stud services. This process is iterated over the years and thereby enhances the genetics of the livestock. The bulls in turn have to prove themselves at precisely this event, only once a year, every Pongal. 

In other words, if you are a bull – this is as good as it gets !! 

Not every bull can be a good jallikattu bull. Even as calves, some bulls acquire a reputation for being uncontrollable. They like to be left alone and sometimes attack without provocation. These calves can then be picked up and trained to be a jallikattu bull (translation : no hard work). Due to the nature of these bulls, it takes very little to anger them. There is no need for chilli powder. The challenge is to keep them calm. The problem happens only when unprofessional owners try to work up ordinary bulls. Due to the calm nature of ordinary cattle, they need more than crowds, noise, and drum beats. Enter chilli powder, punches to genitals, etc. You can already see a case for regulation here. Only registered owners must be allowed. There is also a case for registering individual bulls with the government officials after vetenary doctors examine them (maybe they can be branded by the vets).

4. A unique martial sport with great economic potential

We dont have many of these valour sports in India. A well organized and regulated event will draw thousands of foreign tourists to southern Tamilnadu in the pleasant month of January. The prizes to the winning youth will increase from pots and pans to cash, bikes, and even cars. The winning bulls can also make the bull owners rich and feed into a positive economic cycle enhancing the entire livestock.  You can even have top corporates tying up with bull owners and opening up more job opportunities. Why would we Indians want to let go of a treasure like this ?

Some practical ideas :

1. The TN state government must form a TN Jallikattu Regulatory board under the sports ministry.

2. Top bull owners and temple authorities must be called and be made to agree on a formal set of rules. Each temple can have minor differences in rules according to their tradition.

3. The bull owners must be registered with the above board before participating in the event.

4. The bulls themselves must be registered and government vets must examine them (brand or permanent mark with seal if necessary)

6. The spectators must be kept away from the bulls using two layers of barricades.

7. The government can even think about constructing special arenas near willing temples with facility for TV / photo crews/ foreign tourists/ PA system etc.  Think about announcing past win record of bulls, to make the event more enjoyable.

8. The TN sports minister must take ultimate responsibility for conduct of this event.

9. Involve the blue cross, who are also doing a great job. Allay their concerns and take action when they present video evidence of animal abuse.

 10. Ban more than one (these days it seems one guy cant control it, so maybe two max) to have a go at each bull at any one time. You cant have ten guys pulling at the bull. Even kids can do it, it is not bravery.

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96 Responses

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  1. Conrius said, on January 15, 2008 at 10:04 pm

    When looking for a potential groom in India we generally ask known friends/relatives about the boy, is he good looking, clean habits, you look at his resume, you know if he is well educated, look at his bank balance, you know if he is well to do. All said and done, how do I know if a potential groom is strong and courageous? Civilization or not I would still like to know if the person marrying the girl is bold enough to face problems or maybe even confront men who may be harrasing her. Long story short, enter Jalli-kattu. Prove your mettle as a courageous and strong man and be gauranteed the most beautiful damsel in the town.

  2. Confused said, on January 15, 2008 at 11:02 pm

    RC, the video is not exactly as you have portrayed it. It seems like thousands trying to incite one poor bull.

  3. realitycheck said, on January 16, 2008 at 3:38 am

    Confused,

    This is due to lack of regulation of the sport. Usually one guy latches on and within seconds others pile on to the bull. Without any access control to the arena, there is simply no way to prevent the other hangers on. Even if a crowd is set on the bull, it is a far cry from animal cruelty because almost all bulls make it without permanent harm. Chili powder and pokes in the genitals are more serious allegations.

    Conrius,

    I dont think any brides are on offer. It may win a few bragging rights, but almost never the most beautiful damsel. At least not these days.

  4. shankin said, on January 16, 2008 at 4:16 am

    my first reaction (and my friends too) was, “are you being sarcastic?”. if you aren’t, read on.
    you are saying, “a short tempered guy like to be angry, so lets intimidate him” …. the bull wants to be left alone .. we are deriving pleasure out of its frustration. when we do it to a junior, we call it ragging, when we do it to bull, we call it Jallikattu.

  5. Gopi Shankar said, on January 17, 2008 at 6:41 am

    Written in very good English and so definitely you are well educated, but your views sound quite archaic, barbaric and uncivilized. The sport has no role in a modern society. Despite the guidelines and safeguards, you still had dozens of men trying to tame one bull. Why don’t you advocate that it should be a single bull versus a single man contest? Almost all the support for this barbaric practice will disappear!

    You are justifying it by citing other equally bad or horrifying bad examples. Just because the Spaniards do it or just because draught animals suffer, this doesn’t in anyway justify this cruel practice. To keep it short, two wrongs do not make one right.

    As for the religious significance, there is also an equally strong belief in Rajasthan that the practice of Sati will bring rain and prosperity to villages. I am not sure about the first, but the second is true. There is a economic value in burning a widow on her husband’s funeral pyre, building a temple for her and then the pilgrims and money starts flowing in. Will that economic justification be good to legalise and popularize Sati?

    And then whether its bull control or bull taming, it’s a matter of semantics mate. You can argue till cows come home on that! Think of some stronger points to argue your case.

    The whole idea of using animals, be in jallikattu or circuses or cock fights for human entertainment is disgusting.

    Finally, if its all about earning foreign exchange from tourism, more than bulls, the Thailand model will bring the greenbacks. I am sure you understand what I mean and will you advocate that model for India? Will you do anything for money, more so if the money is green in colour? Common mate, the world has moved on and try to come out of the 15th century mindset that you are stuck in.

    Lastly, Periyar once called it the ‘kaatumirandi’ lingo, looks like the people of southern districts who support this practice are really the ‘kaatumirandis’. Before you pull out a Tirupaachi veecharuval, I am a Tamil too! And ashamed of being one.

  6. Reason said, on January 17, 2008 at 6:45 am

    >> The whole idea of using animals, be in jallikattu or circuses or cock fights for human entertainment is disgusting.

    Using animals for human nourishment?

    >> I am a Tamil too! And ashamed of being one.

    I would understand if someone was ashamed of being a *Dravida*. But being a Tamil? That is one several thousand year strong civilization.

  7. Gopi Shankar said, on January 17, 2008 at 7:30 am

    Well, did I ever justify that? Using animals during Stone Age was okay because there was little else that humans could find to eat, but today, we have enough alternatives to animals. Again, using one wrong to justify another.

    Dravida or Tamil…again a matter of semantics used by Karunanidhi and his ilk! Don’t mean much these days when the whole of idea of the Aryan invasion of India is disputed. Just because it’s a thousand year old civilization, I don’t have to justify and be proud of all that Tamils do. I am sorry, I don’t have to confirm always!

  8. Reason said, on January 17, 2008 at 8:14 am

    >> Well, did I ever justify that? Using animals during Stone Age was okay because there was little else that humans could find to eat, but today, we have enough alternatives to animals. Again, using one wrong to justify another.

    I think the issue here is Judicial or executive interference in a religious or cultural pratice. I dont think the issue was about individual tastes, likes or approvals. I thought the post brought that out.

    If the courts or the executive are to intervene in one issue with the reason of cruelty to animals, they might just have to ban all animal slaughter as well. I may personally support that too, but my personal preferences are really not the issue here.

  9. Gopi Shankar said, on January 17, 2008 at 8:42 am

    Well, be it place of Rama’s birth or the bridge that he built, the courts have had to intervene to settle the matter. So to say that courts cannot intervene in matters of faith is a specious argument. Some scholars believe that the caste system started with the Rg Veda. Religious origins…so law or court can intervene in the matter.

    It’s not my individual opinion. It’s the collective opinion of hundreds of right thinking people. If democracy is about majority opinions, courts are for hearing and protecting the voice of the minority.

    I would like to see the end of meat eating, but just because that goal hasn’t been achieved as yet, it doesn’t mean that we let animals suffer to entertain humans. You are advocating have all or have none approach. It doesn’t work that way. In Western countries, they know they cannot stop animals being killed for food, but they have tried to mitigate suffering by introducing stunning and humane killing methods. A gradualist approach. I hope you understand.

  10. Reason said, on January 17, 2008 at 9:25 am

    >> In Western countries, they know they cannot stop animals being killed for food, but they have tried to mitigate suffering by introducing stunning and humane killing methods. A gradualist approach. I hope you understand.

    I do. it is hypocrisy. ‘Humane killing methods’ sounds pretty neat, btw.

    >> So to say that courts cannot intervene in matters of faith is a specious argument.

    That was not my argument. My argument was that if the courts or executive intervene in one set of practices using cruelty to animals, they should do so in all.

    And why am I reminded of the strange love that cow-eating animal lovers have for human-child-killing stray dogs? 🙂

  11. realitycheck said, on January 17, 2008 at 10:35 am

    Gopi Shankar,

    Please be specific about the cruelty aspect. I have laid out in ths post the very common street knowledge about the (relatively) privileged life led by these bulls.

    It is not sufficient if it offends your or my urban sensibilities. The cruelty charge must be of such a high order that it can be used stand-alone to trump a centuries old *HINDU* religious tradition.

  12. Gopi Shankar said, on January 17, 2008 at 10:42 am

    Oh come off it mate…we animal lovers are neither cow eating nor love to see dogs eating kids. Btw, how often do dogs eat children? Or do they eat at all? Its an ancient argument that has been flogged to death by our detractors.

    Btw, I am trying to figure what your stand is or what you intend saying. You have been denying everything…do you really have an opinion on any of these issues or just arguing for the heck of it? Go back to your postings and you aren’t really saying anything novel or intelligent!

  13. Gopi Shankar said, on January 17, 2008 at 10:47 am

    Ok Reality…these bulls are treated well through the year only to be tortured on one day of the year. That’s not good enough. Yes, it is cruel to rub chilli powder into their eyes, feed them on arrack and then have hundreds of so called brave men chase these animals and subdue them. In the process, the animals are subjected to physical abuse, beating, tails being pulled, pushed etc. And the mental trauma that the animal goes thru…all to entertain the crowds around! As specific as it can be, what more do you need? Or you asking for more cruelty to justify a ban?

    What is Hindu about it? If it is Hindu, why is that some backward parts of Tamil Nadu have jallikattu while more staunch Hindu states such as Gujarat / Rajasthan don’t have it? And caste is also a centuries old Hindu tradition, why not continue it? So anything that is old is good for you and needs to be continued? Something more sensible please!

  14. Barbarindian said, on January 17, 2008 at 10:47 am

    Who is Periyar?

  15. realitycheck said, on January 17, 2008 at 10:50 am

    >> I think the issue here is Judicial or executive interference in a religious or cultural pratice. >>

    Absolutely.

    Reason, you have a good post on your blog !

  16. realitycheck said, on January 17, 2008 at 11:16 am

    Thanks for the specifics – lets consider them.

    >> Yes, it is cruel to rub chilli powder into their eyes,

    Agreed. At best a case for regulation. This is not a common practice or part of tradition. The most pampered bulls such as the temple-owned bulls at the Muniyandi Swami temple are sacred – no one will allow chilli powder to be rubbed into their eyes.

    >> feed them on arrack

    Not part of tradition. Even if this has become commonplace it is not cruel. Neither is feeding the bulls pongal and ganja. Our dog used to drink beer on its own, although it had no access to ganja.

    >> and then have hundreds of so called brave men chase these animals

    chasing is not cruel

    >> and subdue them.

    again no cruelty. Subduing by Pulling tails, legs , horns, trying to hold on to a greased rump (none of them are cruel). The biggest problem with multiple guys jumping on a single bull is that it ruins the sport and makes you not want to watch such a one-sided event.

    >> In the process, the animals are subjected to physical abuse, beating, tails being pulled, pushed etc.

    Lets ignore “pulling” and “pushing” (not cruel)

    Consider “Physical abuse and beating” – the participants are completely unarmed – they dont even wear shoes.

    Think about it : The most objective way to measure charges of animal cruelty in any event is to check if the animal dies. If the event was sooo cruel, then we would be having atleast occassional cases of the bulls intestines spilling out or many bulls emerging with bloodied bodies and broken horns.

    The circus case is different. It is not the event, but the entire caged life of the circus animals that takes centre stage. You agree that the bulls lead a 5-star life by bovine standards on normal days and get to provide stud service to the most productive cows.

    The cock fighting case is also different as I was arguing with a Telugu friend. There is no religious significance. The loser cock dies and sometimes both cocks die in the event. Ditto for pit bull fighting. No humans are involved in the contest.

    I am yet to see a non-emotional clear cut case for banning Jallikattu.

  17. Bruno said, on January 17, 2008 at 11:22 am

    My comment on a Tamil Blog Post http://marchoflaw.blogspot.com/2008/01/blog-post.html

    மனிதனின் உயிருக்கு ஆபத்து என்றால் – கார் ரேஸ், பைக் ரேஸ், பங்கி ஜம்ப் போன்ற விளையாட்டுக்கள் மிகவும் ஆபத்தானவை….

    ஏன் விமானப்படை சாகஸம் (அதுவும் கடற்கரையில் ஆயிரக்கணக்கில் மக்களை வைத்துக்கொண்டு) ஆபத்தில்லையா ???

    மாடுகளின் மேல் அக்கறை என்றால் –> ஜல்லிக்கட்டு மாடுகளை எவ்வளவு பிரியத்துடன் (?? பக்தியுடன்) வளர்க்கிறார்கள் ….. இது தடை செய்யப்பட்டால் இந்த மாடுகள் கொல்லதிற்கு லாரியில் (அதுவும் ஒரே லாரியில் 50 மாடுகள்) அனுப்ப பட வாய்ப்பு உள்ளதே
    —–
    தாங்கள் கூறியது போல் பார்வையாளர்களை பத்திரப்படுத்தினால் போதும்
    —–

    வீரர்களுக்கு காயம் பட வாய்ப்புள்ளது. ஆனால் முறையான சிகிச்சை அளித்தால் உயிர் இழப்பை தவிர்க்கலாம்.

    ——
    நான் மதுரையில் எலும்பு முறிவு துறையில் இருந்தபோது கவனித்ததில்
    மாடு குத்தி உடன் இறப்பவர்கள் குறைவு..(உடனடியாக / முறையான வைத்தியம் பார்க்காததால்) அந்த புண் செப்டிக் ஆகி சீழ் வைத்து அவதிப்படுபவர்களே அதிகம்

    வீரர்கள் 6 மாதங்களுக்கு முன்னர் tetanus toxoid + போட்டிக்கு முன்னர் prophylactic anaerobic,G+ve,G-ve antibiotics ஊசி / மாத்திரை கட்டாயம் போட்டுக்கொள்ள வேண்டும் என்று விதி கொண்டு வந்தால் பெறும்பாலான உயிர் இழப்புக்களை தவிர்க்கலாம்.

    • raja said, on October 11, 2011 at 7:06 am

      super

      • raja said, on October 11, 2011 at 7:06 am

        my life is jallikatu

  18. Barbarindian said, on January 17, 2008 at 11:29 am

    RC,

    For the clueless people not from the region, could you please summarise the political situation? Basically, do Dravidians favor the ban and if so, why is the Karunanidhi Government fighting the ban (invoking Hinduism, no less)? How does the sport of Jallikattu relate to the caste equation and/or India/Bharat debate?

  19. Bruno said, on January 17, 2008 at 11:31 am

    There are few different spots

    1. Jallikattu . ஜல்லிக்கட்டு
    2. Aeru thazuvuthal. ஏறு தழுவுதல்
    3. Manju virattu. மஞ்சு விரட்டு

    Each have their own set of rules…. The problem comes when you mix the rules

    By the way, there is Little cruelty to the bulls in these events. This is not like a circus or spanish bull fight.

    If the sport is banned, the bulls will be send to Kerala [for meat 😦 ]

    If at all there is cruelty involved, it is the (over interested) spectators getting hurt. !!!
    ————-
    While working at Ortho dept in Madurai, I have been even deputed to the on-site emergency team. We get at least 200 cases every season …..

    The bulls hardly suffer a injury
    The guys who are trained (they get trained for one year) escape with minor abrasion. (They know how to safeguard their chest and abdomen) and I have hardly seen a trained bull-tamer (Not bull “fighter”) getting a fracture….and just get a dressing or some times just tincture

    All those who land up in Ortho ward at Madurai Medical College with Fractures and Surgical wards with Chest and Abdomen Injuries are the by standers.

    In addition to the suggestions you gave, there needs to be one more –> Do it in a well enclosed place with least trouble to public

    Spectators are not allowed to go inside the boxing ring or Racing Track… Why allow them here and let them get injured…..

  20. Bruno said, on January 17, 2008 at 11:35 am

    If you can see this video http://youtube.com/watch?v=wCZng0YsKyA you can see that there is no safety for the spectators….

    Worse, they let the bull run in the streets !!! This has to be contained and the government should do something about this…..

    //6. The spectators must be kept away from the bulls using two layers of barricades.//

    The need of the hour is to do this in an enclosed arena with clear demarcation between the spectators and the participants….

  21. Reason said, on January 17, 2008 at 12:02 pm

    >> Go back to your postings and you aren’t really saying anything novel or intelligent!

    looks like that comment on strange animal loves did touch some raw nerve 🙂

  22. Reason said, on January 17, 2008 at 12:03 pm

    >> Who is Periyar?

    Ramasamy Naicker, the founder of the Dravidian mutt 🙂

  23. realitycheck said, on January 17, 2008 at 3:01 pm

    Barb,

    >> Basically, do Dravidians favor the ban and if so,

    Nobody favours the ban.

    >> why is the Karunanidhi Government fighting the ban (invoking Hinduism, no less)?

    They dont have a choice. The main castes involved in organizing the event (e.g, upper castes like Thevars) are highly religious. Contrary to what is portrayed, atheism is a non-starter in the rural areas and even urban areas in the south. The dravidian movement is more about tying down groups of people to concrete benefits than anything else. This would explain why dominant castes like the Thevars swallow their pride when the CM attacks Kshatriya Ram. Sethupathy (Thevar) kings like Muthuramalingam / Pandithurai were responsible for pouring their efforts into temples at Rameswaram, etc.

    In short, atheism has never been part of Tamil tradition.

    Even if you accept the Dravidian movement, it does not offer a way to classify people clearly (for example what about Muslims who came down in the 15th century, or Naickers who occupied Tamil lands when Vijayanagar expanded its influence pushing the only Tamil power – the Pandiyans south of Madurai).

    >> How does the sport of Jallikattu relate to the caste equation and/or India/Bharat debate?

    Not much. It is just a tradition like the act of making Pongal and eating sugarcane. No one really questions the need or origin of Jallikattu – it has always been there. Without it throngs of people of all castes will be left with a huge hole in their festivities ( only in the southern districts ).

  24. Barbarindian said, on January 17, 2008 at 11:55 pm

    RC,

    Thanks for the detailed explanations, it is a lot clearer now.

    Since the tradition attracts universal support, no one is going to ban it anytime soon. It is already being held with better safeguards, pretty much in line with your suggestions. CNN-IBN reports that about 55 dudes are already headed for Dr. Bruno’s hospital.

  25. Bruno said, on January 18, 2008 at 1:00 am

    CNN-IBN reports that about 55 dudes are already headed for Dr. Bruno’s hospital.
    Though I am no more working at Madurai, what pains me mostly about Jallikattu is that this is (probably) the only sports where more spectators get injured than participants !!!

    And it is easily avoidable.. All you need is a barricade

    And the next irritation is that NO ONE is talking about this aspect, but only talking about stray incidents of biting the tail !!!

  26. Bruno said, on January 18, 2008 at 1:02 am

    You can see Photos of today’s event http://marchoflaw.blogspot.com/2008/01/blog-post_17.html

    It is a lot more organised …with barricades (compare with http://youtube.com/watch?v=wCZng0YsKyA) … In hindsight, the court intervention has benefited the common man 🙂 🙂

  27. Tom sawyer said, on January 18, 2008 at 5:33 am

    Why can’t organizations fighting for cruelty to animals and getting a ban on Issues like Jallikattu, try their hand in Bakrid festivities ?

    They run camels from Rajasthan to Southern Tamil nadu and kill them on the streets.

    A case was filed, and what the supreme court said was any body’s guess!

  28. Reason said, on January 18, 2008 at 6:00 am

    >> They run camels from Rajasthan to Southern Tamil nadu and kill them on the streets.

    apparently there are ‘humane killing methods’. Ask gopi shankar.

  29. Gopi Shankar said, on January 18, 2008 at 8:06 am

    We are back to comparative cruelty! Yes, they run the camels and if you ask them they will ask us to stop the Hindu barbarians from conducting jallikattu and if you ask these morons, they ask for the camel killings to be stopped. The favourite Indian / Hindu pastime of Muslim bashing?

    I am waiting for some body to come up with one good reason to continue Jallikattu. And don’t say we want to do it because ‘we are like that only’!

  30. Gopi Shankar said, on January 18, 2008 at 8:08 am

    Nobody favours the ban?

    Please see The Hindu over the last one week and the sheer number of letters supporting the ban. At least some right thinking people (and there are some of them left in Tamil Nadu) support the ban. Not everybody is stupid to support jallikattu!

  31. Reason said, on January 18, 2008 at 8:39 am

    >> The favourite Indian / Hindu pastime of Muslim bashing?

    why would asking for animal cruelty standards to be applied uniformly, amount to muslim bashing?

    and since when did the Hindu become the sole torch bearer of right thinking? quit using those useless tags of right thinking, progressive, forward, inclusive, secular or whatever crap the current fad is. Even the commies are quitting socialism.

  32. Gopi Shankar said, on January 18, 2008 at 9:04 am

    I am sorry…I thought the Hindus were all of these and more. Thanks for enlightening me that they are none of this!!!

  33. Reason said, on January 18, 2008 at 10:23 am

    >> I thought the Hindus were all of these and more

    May be they are, but not to the meanings that you and your tribe hold these words to.

  34. Gopi Shankar said, on January 18, 2008 at 11:30 am

    Words are words and they have meanings as defined by English dictionaries…I don’t have any other meanings for them…may be you have an issue understanding them.

  35. Reason said, on January 18, 2008 at 12:33 pm

    >> Words are words and they have meanings as defined by English dictionaries…I don’t have any other meanings for them

    but you do. Asking for equal application of animal cruelty standards becomes muslim ‘bashing’ in your dictionary. A bunch of people writing letters to the communist rag Hindu opposing Jallikattu become ‘right thinking’ – regardless of what their opinion might be on other practices of real animal cruelty. You go beyond words and even coin up brilliant phrases – ‘humane killing methods’.

    Does halal method of killing fall under ‘humane’? Do I become a muslim basher for asking this question?

    Using ‘progressive, democratic’ etc tags for themselves, and using ‘fascist, reactionary. anti-people’ etc tags for those who oppose them is the favorite trick of the communists. How does ‘progressive, democratic’ etc apply to a bunch of morons following a dead brainless ideology that killed millions of people from china to cambodia? But it would, if there are morons who can think of ‘humane killing methods’.

  36. Sharan Sharma said, on January 18, 2008 at 2:58 pm

    That was a refreshing post, RC! Never knew all this. Thanks.

  37. GS said, on January 18, 2008 at 10:00 pm

    “Progressive”,”right thinking”,”pro-people policies”,”liberal” etc-all these words have become something like “secular” -once upon a time a genuine word that meant something – now a word that invokes contempt/derision among people. Other words/phrases that spring to mind are “reputed historian” (this for someone who might not be able to spell history), “towering intellectual” (these are usually mutually proclaimed- A calls B “great intellectual thinker” and B calls A “a leading and highly respected thinker and an authority on ….” some other time.

  38. Gopi Shankar said, on January 21, 2008 at 4:59 am

    So you guys are all a bunch of BJP wallahs! Those chaps whose thinking is frozen in the 12th Century?! The world secular ticks you off? Ha ha! The same chaps who will start a communal riot in the name of protecting the cow, but will torture the bulls because the only difference between cows and bulls is the latter have balls! Which the BJP wallahs don’t!!!

  39. Tom sawyer said, on January 21, 2008 at 6:26 pm

    GS,

    Thanks,

    Jallikattu, is ancient tamil tradition.

    All we ask here is a little bit of sanity be applied in this bull fighting game and rules and regulations be written down and followed.

    There are gaping holes in arguments that you put forth for banning Jallikattu.

    You cannot stand a question that why you animal lovers cant question Bakrid massacres.

    You become like a gutless coward and turn the argument calling us muslim bashers.

    If you the brave one, please file a PIL against Bakrid killing as well. Have you got the BALLS to do it ?

    Jallikattu animals are pampered lot, and are never allowed to pull carts, or plough. For a sample of how jallikattu bulls are treated in and around madurai, please watch “Virumandi” tamil movie starring kamal hassan.

    proof of jallikattu, and other bull fighting games being part of ancient tamil culture.

    எருதுகளோடு பொருதி ஏதும் உலோபாய்காண் நம்பி
    கருதிய தீமைகள் செய்து கஞ்சனைக் கால்கொடு பாய்ந்தாய்

    -பெரியாழ்வார்

  40. HH said, on January 21, 2008 at 6:28 pm

    GS is talking all BS

  41. GS said, on January 21, 2008 at 9:59 pm

    >>So you guys are all a bunch of BJP wallahs!
    Where does that come into this argument.

    >>Those chaps whose thinking is frozen in the 12th Century?!
    Again abuse without any evidence. Simple throwing about words and phrases won’t get you anywhere.

    >>The world secular ticks you off? Ha ha!

    With the way it’s currently practiced, yeah it ticks me off. And I have instant distrust when someone says they belong to the secular camp.

  42. HH said, on January 22, 2008 at 2:40 am

    GS means Gopi Shankar

  43. realitycheck said, on January 22, 2008 at 7:24 am

    15 cows died of starvation in the Rameswaram temple. The government department HR&CE is in charge of their welfare. I challenge the Blue Cross or any other animal rights activist to try protesting.

    http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/004200801191741.htm

    It does not take a hero to tar an established hindu tamil tradition as barbaric using animal rights as an excuse.

  44. Gopi Shankar said, on January 22, 2008 at 11:13 am

    It amazes me how these Tamils let movies rule their lives. Not just movie stars, but overhear a bus stop conversation in TN, it’s about movies. A mad lot. And Tom, think of something more than a Tamil movie to buttress your argument. Or being a Tamil, you can’t perhaps think of anything beyond the screen?

    If Hindus cannot junk centuries old rituals, it’s a tall order to expect the Muslims to do so. They are stuck in a bigger rut than Hindus. At the end of the day, all religions of all brands have meant nothing but death and destruction to mankind and more so to animals. So stop using the religious argument and see the humanist point guys. I feel the world would have been a better place without religion and the reactionary idea of God.

    Tom – I am waiting to hear something original other than ‘jk is an ancient Tamil ritual’. Something more modern please?

    Hey HH – just shut up yar. If I am talking some BS why don’t u say something sensible? I don’t need any certification from you rascal.

  45. Barbarindian said, on January 22, 2008 at 1:11 pm

    I feel the world would have been a better place without religion

    That’s just like, your opinion man. You ought to have protested when they were making the constitution. Too late and too bad.

  46. suresh said, on January 22, 2008 at 2:35 pm

    The issue that concerns me is that the judiciary has got itself involved in it. Whether or not Jallikattu should be tolerated is, to me, a political question and ought to be dealt with politically. The legislature is the proper venue for dealing with political conflicts. Why the judiciary should get involved in this is beyond me. On this and many other issues, I wonder, why doesn’t our judiciary simply say that it cannot deal with this issue and throw it back to the legislature and the executive. If every conceivable issue can be dealt with by the judiciary, why have a legislature and an executive at all?

  47. realitycheck said, on January 22, 2008 at 2:53 pm

    How do we prevent the “tyranny of the majority” or “the tyranny of the media” if the judiciary takes a hands off approach ?

  48. suresh said, on January 22, 2008 at 5:26 pm

    Of course, there are no guarantees that the legislature and the executive will come up with “correct” or “wise” decisions. The point is that I think that the judiciary is overshooting its brief by getting involved in the nitty-gritty of political decisions.

    My comment, incidentally, did not ask for the judiciary to adopt a “hands off” approach.

  49. Tom sawyer said, on January 23, 2008 at 2:42 am

    Gopi shankara,

    You first explain to all of us here, what exactly constitutes Animal rights violation.

    Then we would try to see if Tamil “ritual”, as you call it, really fits the violation that you level against it.

    I brought religion into it as my point of view. Please go convince the Dravidian mutt peetathipathi, Mr. Veeramani, and Dravidian ideologue CM karunanidhi on this issue. They all hate religion (particularly hinduism) as much as you do. So, they must be “humanists” according to you rather than the “hindu barbarians” that you meet and argue here.

  50. realitycheck said, on January 23, 2008 at 2:52 am

    >> The point is that I think that the judiciary is overshooting its brief by getting involved in the nitty-gritty of political decisions. >>

    Suresh,

    What if the petitioners allegations are well founded (i.e. there is indeed extreme cruelty involved) ?

    (Take the case of cock fights in some AP-TN border districts )

  51. Reason said, on January 23, 2008 at 7:15 am

    >> It amazes me how these Tamils let movies rule their lives. Not just movie stars, but overhear a bus stop conversation in TN, it’s about movies. A mad lot. And Tom, think of something more than a Tamil movie to buttress your argument. Or being a Tamil, you can’t perhaps think of anything beyond the screen?

    Tom used the movie example only as a sample to see how the jallikattu bulls are treated. He used a quote from Periyazhvar to ‘buttress’ his argument.

    How much did you score in comprehension tests?

    >> If I am talking some BS why don’t u say something sensible? I don’t need any certification from you rascal.

    Did anyone tell you Hindus or the BJP party needed any certifications from you that you have been dropping so freely here? You a rascal ?

  52. Gopi Shankar said, on January 23, 2008 at 8:32 am

    Reason is a misnomer for you…you are an epitome of lack of reason and brains. I didn’t quite understand the Tamil verse…I can’t read the language. Anyway, Tom uses an ancient text or a Tamil movie to justify himself…I was expecting something more scientific and rational but I realize I am expecting too much from chaps like you. You cannot use a 1,000 old text to justify a modern situation. Not very different from the Muslims using the Quran to justify jihad today! Are you chaps any better than them? Religion texts have to be relevant for today’s situations or they should be simply dumped.

    And I am surprised that you still stand by the movie…as if that movie was a reflection of reality. I thought movies, particularly south Indian ones were fictitious. Or perhaps being a Tamil you cannot differentiate between real life and reel life! May be you also believe when one of your movie starts catches an incoming bullet with his bare hands and hurls it back at the baddies to kill them? Given your IQ levels, I wouldn’t be surprised if you believe that too!

    Me calling the BJP wallahs and you chaps names was in response to me being called names due to my secular leanings. Hence you are rascals not me!

  53. suresh said, on January 23, 2008 at 9:01 am

    What if the petitioners allegations are well founded (i.e. there is indeed extreme cruelty involved) ?

    (Take the case of cock fights in some AP-TN border districts )

    Even then. Look, personally, I don’t care much for Jallikattu and I think cock fights are unacceptable. But I don’t think these issues should be dealt with by the judiciary.

    It is impossible to draw a firm so-called “Lakshman rekha” delineating what is the judiciary’s domain and what should be left to the executive and the legislature. It is just my opinion that in pronouncing judgments on such issues, the judiciary is stepping into things that are best left to the other two wings of our polity. Ultimately, my fear is that by doing so – by constantly expanding the domain of its operation – the judiciary will end up harming itself. Sometimes it is best not to interfere even though the temptation to do so – from the best of motives – is very strong. This is just my opinion.

  54. Reason said, on January 23, 2008 at 10:36 am

    >> Even then. Look, personally, I don’t care much for Jallikattu and I think cock fights are unacceptable. But I don’t think these issues should be dealt with by the judiciary.

    The ninth schedule verdict delivered in Jan 2007 would be a good thing to study on the question of judicial intervention. RC brought out the question of ‘tyranny of the majority’ or ‘tyranny of the media’. What constitutes ‘tyranny’ is a fine point.

    From the ninth schedule verdict, things that interfere with ‘fundamental rights forming the basic structure’ of the constitution are fit cases for Judiciary to intervene.

    I would agree with Suresh that jallikattu or cock fight may not be cases to be settled in courts. If there are existing acts passed by legislatures regarding animal cruelty, they can be used to regulate these. And being a secular state, legislatures would do well to both
    – enact such legislations equally for all religions
    – show equal sensitivity to all faiths when deciding on issues that impinge on matters of faith.

  55. realitycheck said, on January 23, 2008 at 1:27 pm

    Reason,

    I got rid of the PM Resigning post !!

    Thanks a lot. I messed up.

  56. realitycheck said, on January 23, 2008 at 1:42 pm

    >> But I don’t think these issues should be dealt with by the judiciary. >>

    Suresh,

    1) The court did not take this up suo-moto.

    2) What should the court do if petitioners approach it with what they consider shocking evidence of animal cruelty ?

    3) What about public issues where state actors are implictly involved or do not care ? For example : Lake encroachment. Should the court instruct the district administrators to repair lake embankments in response to a PIL ? If such a PIL cannot be entertained, then where are the checks.

    ( A broken lake embankment = a dry lake = acres of land opened up for encroachment )

  57. suresh said, on January 23, 2008 at 7:12 pm

    What should the court do if petitioners approach it with what they consider shocking evidence of animal cruelty?

    I am constrained in that I am not a lawyer just someone with an interest in such issues…Given that basic limitation, I would say (i) if there is a relevant law, then direct the government to implement it; (ii) if none exists, then dismiss the case.

    What I don’t like is the court stepping into formulate policy when there isn’t a relevant law. You can take issue with me on this point. However, I would note that evidence of say, untouchability is not very difficult to obtain and there is a relevant law applicable here. For that matter, child labor is prevalent, law or no law. Dowry deaths and female infanticide go on…We have not addressed man’s inhumanity to man, laws notwithstanding. At least to me, animal cruelty is a lesser priority though I personally cringe every time I see a pathetic looking dog limping along on the road. You don’t really need to go as far as the TN/Andhra border to see animal cruelty in action.

    Regarding public issues, my attitude is the same. I don’t think the courts are called upon to make public policy. To do so is tempting as I noted before particularly when the legislature and the executive are dysfunctional (which is most of the time). Unfortunately, this can have disastrous consequences over the long run, not least for the judiciary itself.

    I really don’t have anything more to add. I guess you will not agree with me which is fine – let us agree to disagree.

  58. Barbarindian said, on January 24, 2008 at 6:12 am

    I really don’t have anything more to add.

    Thank God for small mercies.

  59. Barbarindian said, on January 24, 2008 at 6:17 am

    I thought movies, particularly south Indian ones were fictitious.

    Insightful.

  60. realitycheck said, on January 25, 2008 at 8:47 am

    suresh,

    I was just probing to find out more about your position.

  61. sanka said, on January 25, 2008 at 4:02 pm

    In the UK these are the usual pieces of conversation one can pick up during a tube (underground) trip

    the football league matches
    the weather
    how immigtants have spoilt London

    What does Mr Gopi Shaker talk witth his acquanintances in his leisure time.
    Can you please throw us some insight so that the tamils can at least be more ‘civilised’.

  62. HH said, on January 27, 2008 at 11:27 am

    GS (Gopi Shankar) talks BS (Bull shit) with his acquaintances. And all his acquaintances nod YES SIR, YES SIR like Zombies.

  63. Manya said, on January 27, 2008 at 6:36 pm

    How many of you here supporting this torture would take part in it?

    I believe Indian males and their masculanity issues are really that questionable, that they have to be proven. I wonder what kind of woman would like crowd of savage guys running after a poor bull who has no clue why this menacing crowd has put pepper in its eyes, while pulling his tail and teasing him to attack. Would you like being treated like that? No, but you would love to degrade some other helpless living creature
    I am not sure how they came up with this practice, isnt nandi(a bull) shivas vehicle and worshipped in South India? We have deep reverence for our gods and their stones/statues and none for the living breathing life around us…quite ironic. India never fails to surprise me!

    “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated”- Gandhi

  64. Gaurav said, on January 27, 2008 at 7:39 pm

    Oh come on this thread is beyond ludicrous. I think those bulls will prefer a bit of chilly compared to being their balls cut off.
    And Manya dude, stop this psychoanalysis. It stopped being cool in 80’s, now it is just annoying.

  65. Manya said, on January 28, 2008 at 7:29 pm

    Beyond ludicrous this thread is, ofcourse so what are you doing here? As ludicrous as Jallikuttu -perhaps! Balls of any Bull or any man should be cut off I cant say or lets say I havent gone far that deep into cruelty yet to ponder upon that question.. but perhaps you would prefer chilli pepper ..ahem in bulls eyes

    Cruelty is never cool dude!

  66. Barbarindian said, on January 29, 2008 at 1:59 am

    No matter how many times you wipe it, there is always another drop.

  67. Gaurav said, on January 29, 2008 at 10:06 am

    Manya,

    Neutering is a normal practice, whether cruel or not, I don’t know.
    There is a difference between bull and ox, it is the balls. And sure I would prefer chili in my eyes compared to getting neutered, as future of humanity depends on propagation of my genes.

  68. Manya said, on January 29, 2008 at 6:11 pm

    Future of humanity does not depend on your genes. What was the last time you took a look at the human population, big number consider the contributions of India to it.
    “The great humans on the earth”, life will go on without humans much more normally and naturally. We all have done enough harm to our surroundings and ourselves. Karma.
    Humans do many things that are considered normal by “most” normal humans of their normal kind. What is normal for you? The choice of having pepper in eyes or balls being cut, ofcourse these two choices sound very normal. Since these are only two choices proposed, by who…?

    Choose for yourself(if you like) not the bull.

  69. realitycheck said, on January 30, 2008 at 3:54 am

    >> life will go on without humans much more normally and naturally. >>

    Let us say all humans suddenly give in and decide to move to Mars. We will leave the earth to animals for a few decades. How will we find earth after we return after , say a 100 years ?

    The domesticated creatures will be completely wiped out after a brief period of tremendous growth. They are completely vulnerable to predators. We did this to them. We cannot just throw up our hands and leave. We need to prepare them and give them their aggression back. Our street corner Zebu cattle must attack predators like the wildebeest.

    So maybe we should train them to be more aggressive before we move to mars. A “pre-mars bovine-aggression” camp will look exactly like the Jallikattu, dont you agree ?

    Gaurav / Barb,

    Apologies for prolonging the agony !

  70. Manya said, on January 30, 2008 at 4:30 am

    …the wise king speaks atlast. Hah.

  71. maria tatiana said, on February 3, 2008 at 3:24 pm

    SHAME SHAME TAMIL NADU !!This is Animal Cruelty you Barbarians ,dont come to America.

  72. oochappan said, on February 6, 2008 at 7:49 am

    Let me inform you that the photo here is being used without any authorisation coming from my website:
    http://www.pbase.com/oochappan/jallikattu
    without even mentioning a reference or copyright name.
    This is copyright-violation or theft,
    it should be removed or compensated to avoid legal prosecutions,
    even the BBC had the decency to do so and most probably you stole it from there, pity.
    You can contact me privatly on my site.

  73. realitycheck said, on February 7, 2008 at 2:47 am

    There are no policies preventing blogs from linking to BBC content (content hosted on BBCs servers). Linking to BBC does not mean stealing from BBC. The internet is nothing without links.

    I do agree that the copyright notice does not appear when linking. The right way to handle that is to place your copyright within the image itself. This is just a friendly suggestion (even though your tone is not very polite)

    Anyway, as per your request I took out the image and link.

  74. oochappan said, on February 7, 2008 at 5:57 am

    Not respecting someone else’s property is not quite polite .

    Thanks for taking out the image as there was not even a link: the way you projected the image from another site in your blog doesn’t put you above the law.

    Pity you are obviously not aware about copyrights cause some of your issues are quite true and you will find them as well on my site.

    Regards

  75. realitycheck said, on February 7, 2008 at 7:03 am

    I understand your aggressive stance.

    You really should have watermarked it. Merely linking to your image on a widely read broadcasters website offends your copyright so much. This strategy is adopted by most professional media (AP,Indian movie sites, etc). The text below the image does not show up in image searches and I may not have linked to your image if it had. There are plenty of other Jallikattu pictures I could have used – considering the small size and low resolution quality of the image.

    I am completely aware of copyright law and respect it. Which is why I took out the link as soon as you pointed it out. I would have removed it if anyone had pointed it out, not necessarily you – the owner. This is the most I can do.

  76. SOG knives said, on July 18, 2008 at 11:28 am

    SOG knives…

    Interesting ideas… I wonder how the Hollywood media would portray this?…

  77. raja marthandan said, on October 26, 2008 at 8:51 am

    Dear RC
    hi i’m raja marthandan, an ardent lover of jallikattu and i have four bulls.
    some more info on jallikattu:
    there are 3 forms of jallikattu.
    1. vaadi manjivirattu
    this is the form that is practised in the districts of thanjavur, madurai, trichy and salem.
    it involves the running of the bull from the holding pen through a short distance. only one person must cling on to the bull’s hump for the specified distance. if he is able to do so, you have a winner.

    2. virattu manjivirattu
    this is more popular in the districts of madurai, sivagangai. the bulls are released in an open ground. most of the bulls just run away. but a few of them will stand their ground and play. this is not very easy to explain and is better understood, by seeing the actual event.
    3. vadam manjivirattu
    in this version, a bull tied to a forty foot long rope is to be subdued by a team of seven people within a time limit of half an hour. since the bull is tied, this is the most spectator friendly version.

    one important that i would like to tell the unacquainted is that, outsiders see the bulls as animals. not us, we see them as individuals. each and every bull is unique. each one of them has a character.

    one more thing that i want to tell people who believe that the bull is tormented into becoming vicious is ” ignorance is bliss”. nothing could be farther from the truth. i have a year old calf. i am inviting anyone to come and try to touch him. if you are able to do so without getting hurt, then i will become your first supporter in stopping jallikattu. you can conduct any tests on him for the so called chilly powder, arrack etc.the basic principle behind jallikattu is the predator-prey relationship behaviour of cattle. has it ever occurred to people that, while you have cattle thruoghout the world, why is that the event exists only in a couple of places. cattle in general will run when attacked by a predator. but these species of cattle do not run. they stand their ground and face the predator. ever seen a pride of lions hunting a cape buffalo in Africa. compare it with a jallikattu scene and you will see no difference. my request to the people in general is that to analyse, see for your self and then come to a conclusion. just dont believe what ever you see on television or what someone tells you. you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

    and one more thing – as long as people like me live, there is no death to jallikattu. that is the final word.

  78. the viewmaster said, on January 5, 2009 at 10:51 am

    You people have obviously missed the point! There is nothing with the bulls or the tamers or the event itself. It is a non-issue. The real mover of contention is the essence of group activity of village community life. For better understanding please read a write up on ‘village community’ in the Oxford India companion to sociology and social anthropology.

  79. kalai said, on January 6, 2009 at 12:07 pm

    As long there is a single tamilian living on this earth jallikattu will go on… If u r against it u cant be called a tamilian…

  80. kalai said, on January 6, 2009 at 12:11 pm

    If u guys want to stop cruelty to animals.. Stop killing animals for meat too.. Dont use mosquito coils or liquidator.. ban hunting.. stop horse racing..

  81. Aaryaan Pillai said, on January 10, 2009 at 5:39 am

    Armchair Critics and So-called Animal Activists, Pseudo intellectuals and Urban Ethos Promoters who have lost their roots in their villages and are merely surviving in the cities for money and partying weekends; and have no clue about village life should learn to respect the sentimentalities of the Rural world and try to Reform & introduce alternatives instead of repressing or destroying culture.

    Pseudo Culture Guardians or those who have lost their roots abroad and battling an identity crisis should learn to give up socially/morally irrelevant doctrines to justify their barbarism by inflicting damage/hurt to innocent Animals and people alike. If you want a battle, go buy video games instead of ‘controlled’ or ‘supervised’ animal abuse. First, common sense understands that “what is ancient need not be right”. Animals don’t understand your rules. People act on reflex rather than a sensible sporting instinct. The Spirit of the Pongal celebration needs to be fulfilled.

    For instance, Adapting the Bullfight to a much softer and simpler version is worthy (like bull racing, where no humans can only be spectators and never come in contact with the animals). If the animals dont know to run, dont complain. So People on both sides, need to sit and discuss like humans.

    To Both Parties, I ask you this, Don’t you think we need a Rural Olympics involving our tradtional indian sports like Kabbadi, polo, Silambam, etc. Don’t you think the odds we’d have in finding rare talent and building a national team. Traditions are strenghtened by evolution. Ancient bad habits will slowly fade away.

  82. Kumar said, on January 20, 2009 at 10:03 pm

    Hi Guys,

    Interesting arguments… BTW where are the 09 jallikattu videos on the net? its kind of late.. hurry up… I am itching to see some new action.

  83. […] This blog has argued strongly against banning Jallikattu in this post. Not only should we not ban it… […]

  84. karthikeya said, on February 11, 2009 at 12:50 pm

    the interference of the judiciary in to the personal affairs of the hindus is condemnable. the indian judiciary does not have the guts to interfere in the affairs of the islam or christain faith .100 nos of camel were killed in tamilnadu for bakrid what was the judiciary doing ? ( i do not say killing of camels for feast is wrong )in the same manner i want the indian judiciary to keep out of religious matters. the animal welfare board and spca are acting on the behalf of western organizations to ruin indegenous sport.

  85. raja marthandan said, on April 16, 2009 at 11:03 am

    this is for Mr.Gopi shankar…
    the reason why jallikattu exists only in tamil nadu and not other hindu states because the breed of cattle, “irusadhi ” is found only in tamil nadu and not anywhere else. 95% of jallikattu bulls are from this breed. they are by nature very pugnacious and aggressive.
    i hope that clears your doubt.
    want more info. please mail your Q’s to sunking84@gmail.com

  86. Myron Hessian said, on October 21, 2010 at 5:33 am

    This is a wonderful website. I’ve been back several times during the last few days and want to sign up for your feed implementing Google but cannot figure out the best way to do it accurately. Would you know of any instructions?

  87. hari said, on February 10, 2012 at 3:11 pm

    jallikattu go go

  88. […] those who have no idea what this event is. Stop right here and read my 2008 blog on it. “On Jallikattu” and some misconceptions in this comment. I had blogged about it again in 2009 following […]

  89. […] those who have no idea what this event is. Stop right here and read my 2008 blog on it. “On Jallikattu” and some misconceptions in this comment. I had blogged about it again in 2009 following another […]

  90. […] those who have no idea what this event is. Stop right here and read my 2008 blog on it. “On Jallikattu” and some misconceptions in this comment. I had blogged about it again in 2009 following another […]

  91. MANIKANDAN KALIMUTHU said, on December 29, 2015 at 7:13 am

    JALLIKATTU WILL HAPPEN NOW https://realitycheck.wordpress.com/2008/01/15/on-jallikattu/

  92. senthil said, on January 14, 2016 at 7:37 am

    Lift the ban for Jallikattu, Ban PETA instead.. they are sourced out of India, we dont need them to speak about Indian Traditions and Tamilian Values

  93. senthil said, on January 14, 2016 at 7:38 am

    There is so much wrong conceptions created about this Traditional festival sport. And we see an NGO funded outside India is able to influence Law in our country and are able to humiliate the Human values and festival celebrations done by Tamilians in India. If they are against cruelty towards animals, how many of these Organization people support other Multinationals providing pork and beef in their Pizza?

    They say People for Ethical Animal Treatment but Seems they don’t have any Ethical belief of Traditions / Festival values and more than all Emotions of Tamilian Culture. Tamil is one of the oldest of all Cultures across the World. Do agree, we need strict regulations to conduct the Sport but not a complete Ban.
    This is an organization sourced out of India and let this be banned, if they don’t value Indian / Tamilian Tradition and values. If they can spend so much money to get this court verdict, this organizations Taxing and source funding needs to be scrutinized and Probably impose a BAN to these kind of organizations and their activity of playing with Indian values.

    And let them work for stray animals, let them not talk about Pet Bulls being grown by Tamilians. If they want to help, let them help injured Bulls or humans in the sport as first aid crew. They should not rule Tamilian sentiments. In no way these outsourced NGOs should be supported from India, if they are not understanding our Tamilian tradition and cultures. And our legal system is so weak, that it has yielded to such outsourced NGO’s plea. India is peaceful and sovereign country, we worship COW and Bull unlike the people from US, who eat pork and Beef.

    It is a shame to secular state of India, as the sentiments of Tamil people has been neglected and wrongly conceptualized. If Tamilians are so cruel, they will not put the Bull statue in all Shiva Temples and will make it as a part of their prayers, when they visit the Temples.

    Again, regarding the accidents and damage to bull or human life during this festival sport isn’t any different from any other sport. How many car crashes or Bikes crash during the Formula one races? It is a tough sport and accidents will happen. And I see some blogs comparing this sport with the Bull fight and other things. This is not a Bull fight. The Animal is not going to be killed after the sport.

    Tamil Language is one of the ancient Language and We are the People who have given the great Saint poet- Thivalluvar to this world. When this Tamil culture can teach the world about Humanity and proper survival, why will the tradition of the Tamil Society be compromised for an NGO sourced out of India. If we are Indians, we need to Value our Tradition and culture.
    Again Tamil Language has been given the status of “Sem’ozhi” , which means, the value of Tamil Tradition needs to be upheld and Tamil sentiment needs to be protected. We have mention of this sport in Old literature of “Kalithogai” and many other literature. This is 5000 year old culture
    In ancient Days, when a Girl is Born, the Father of the Girl will get a Bull (calf) and will grow it as his Son. Once the Girl grows up and becomes ready for marriage, the Person, who can win the Bull can only marry the Girl. This was a Test of valor for the Bride groom. This was the method used to select the best Groom for the Girl. This is old tradition though. But This cannot be commented by people like ViratKholi, Nagma etc. who don’t have any knowledge of Tamil culture .They cannot compare this sport with old system of Sati. And Tamil culture never encouraged any savage act like Sati. There charges are baseless and let them first learn the Tamil culture and values before offering statements to Press and Media. First they need to understand Tamil culture better. Let them do their job of celebrity and have no right to talk about Tamilians.

  94. durge1952 said, on January 15, 2016 at 5:10 am

    Reality concerned with`Hindu religious practice`and Senthil with Tamil asmita.We know Marathi asmita and Gujarati asmita used by Shivsena and Modi effectively to fool people. Religious or regional sentiments hurt – is a tool in the hands of vested interests to thwart any change in society and maintain status quo. These gentlemen should clarify if we should try to change our society for betterment of people or not or whether whatever reforms took place in Hindu society should be reversed.
    Some issues will have to be decided even if it goes against majority view.that is why courts are there.
    First we dont care about our own people, we dont make any change in our practices according to changing times and then we go on to say `we should value our tradition and culture`.
    In kanyakumari there is always heavy crowd visiting Vivekanand but very few Thivalluvar.Why?
    Emotions/sentiments should not be used to make people take pride in things which divide people,it should be used to foster freindship,develop compassion for other human beings irespective of caste/religion/race.


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